Psyco Home

Psyco_Emotional Home

Is a collection of Five of the Web Post from my St. Chris Website. Here are Snippets of each of the Post.

Chapter One></strong

Psyco_Emotional Home

is a collection of Five of the Web Post from my St. Chris Website. Here are Snippets of each of the Post.

The Four Elements

We are Psyco-Emotional beings housed in Flesh and Bones, held together with Sinew and Muscles that protect our Internal Organs which are organized by our Two Brains. Our Rational Brain and Emotional Brain are working together to create the Life of our being based on our Beliefs about Ourselves, Others and the World around us. Scientists know now that every one of our Trillion Cells are in Concert working together with Melody, Design and Purpose to express what is called ourSelf Image

Our Bodies need Energy to sustain the Life, this we know from our Birth to Death. They say that it comes from the Four Basic Elements of our Universe. It has been said they are the Earth, Wind, Water and Fire. Unique as we are, the Third Planet from the Sun, we find our Life and our Breath from them. Our ancient Beliefs were inspired by natural observation have evolved into Scientific Truths that have come to sustain our Health in a Significant way. Our whole being is be said to be be employed in the use of our Body, Soul and Spirit that enables the creation of our Human experience. Ancient Religions used Meditation to gain a larger perception of Man’s Spirit. Ancient Gregorian Chants a new Scientific Method

Our World churns with an overwhelming for Life. From the beginning of Mankind we have learned to sustain our Bodies with Healthy Foods that enable us to live a Long Life.

Do-you-have-Soul Issues?

Much of our Soul Issues involve from the tendency of our emotional heart to control our decision making. Our emotional heart is desperately trying to fulfill those desires. Understanding our self-image can offers us a clear understanding of how the emotional heart is set in its disposition of control. Our bodies autonomic system controls all the functions of our body automatically by stimulating factors both physical and emotional which the body responds to attributes such as breathing, blood circulation, liver functions and our autoimmune function are some of its purposes. Scientists discovered in the mid nineties while the were mapping the brain that we actually have two
Ancient Solfeggio Frequencies

Chapter Two></strong

Ancient Gregorian Chants have a new Scientific Methods called Iso Tones. You can play theses Solfeggio Frequencies at this Web Page. Solfeggio refers to a belief that a set of Nine frequencies that are derived from numerology were used Centuries ago in Gregorian and Sanskrit chants. These frequencies are believed to create positive shifts in your Mood when you are in close proximity to them.

Chapter Three></strong

Child Development>

The parable of the sower As he was scattering the seed, some 1,) fell along the path, and the birds came and ate it up. 5 Some fell on rocky places, It sprang up quickly, because the soil was shallow. when the sun came up, the plants were scorched, and 2.) they withered because they had no root. 7 Other seed 3.) fell among thorns, which grew up and choked the plants, so that they did not bear grain. 8 Still 4.) other seed fell on good soil. It came up, grew and produced a crop, some multiplying thirty, some sixty, some a hundred times.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development
<strong<Emotional Develment

The emotional development of Children from conception to death.
In the womb a child can sense the emotions of the mother. Negative emotions and extreme trauma can greatly affect the development of a child’s emotions after birth as well as a difficult birth itself.
Physical development is critical in the first four weeks of the child’s health, the colostrum of the mothers milk develops a strong immune system for later life. From four weeks to one year old a child experiences the world around them primarily with their five senses. In reality they are still using a spiritual intuitive reasoning to understand this new world that they are growing in. They begin to express themselves in speech by watching their parents lips and hearing the words spoken to them and then trying to imitate those words. With much repetition and understanding of the words begin to establish the reality of the world around them. From the ages of 1 to 3 years old trust relationships are established and their vocabulary grows as they learn about the world around them. And yet they still haven’t developed a spatial relationship in their environment. If you offer a three-year-old a piece of apple they will most likely say yes. If you asked them after putting the Apple behind your back and ask where is the Apple often don’t know. Preschoolers come to school with an awh of social involvement and an intense desire to learn. My experience with preschoolers revealed that some of them, 15 to 20%, come with deep-seated emotional problems due to negative parenting and also sibling rivalry. The learned behavior from these children often causes them to be jealous of their classmates. Nutrition plays heavily on all Children’s development. Poor nutrition in a preschooler can cause midrange attention deficit. It is evident which children are not being properly cared for at home, they perk right up right after having a snack. The trust level is high among preschoolers and continues to the second grade. I found this to be true because these children when I first meet them often come and hug my leg, they continue up until the second grade. These children are it in the best position for learning than any other grade level, they achieve the highest scores on their AR tests. You have to wonder why the fourth and fifth graders are not scoring as well.

Eight years old is a new beginning for children. In the summer they begin to establish relationships and build new friendships with their peers. They are experiencing new freedom of independence from their parents and guardians, and their dependence in reliance on them dwindles until about 10 years old. Girls experience a physical logical change in their sexuality while boys change around 12 and 13 years old. Ggirls bodies mature faster and they are taller for the same age in this growth period, and because they are more emotionally stable they tend to pay better attention and score higher on tests. The boys, who are more rationally minded and competitive seem to have a attention deficit from their growing conflicts in the classroom. Throughout these grades 3 through 5 the children are threatened by their environment both in and out of school and seek out close relationships to establish best friends. I have found that on the playground children congregate with their best friends and there are often arguments that develop between those who are not best friends. So often I’ve seen children crying because of perceived nonacceptance or misunderstood actions and words. By the time the children reach the end of the fifth grade they develop an attitude of full independence. Some children develop earlier than others and some children hold this rebellion inward instead of rebelling outwardly violently in a real and dramatic way. I have seen this behavior as young as kindergarten children. Mostly in young boys have been abused at home and the only way they know how to react is that learned emotional behavior that the learned from parent or siblings. When substituting in the second grade class within the first few minutes of the class out of the corner of my eye I saw a young man kick someone. Class told me right off that the teacher has a table over in the corner and that when someone misbehaves they have to go there and write why they have done that bad thing. I took him to the table and assumed that he would write down why he had kicked the other student. I checked on him later and he hadn’t written anything, and again later and still nothing after I explained why he needed to explain his actions. At the end of the class I went over and sat down with him and having an understanding of learned behavior from parents and our siblings I guess that someone was kicking him at home. I asked him to did have an older sister, I guessed right. When I asked him if she was kicking him he started crying. I calmed him down and said it is going to be okay. I said that he needed to tell his sister that it isn’t right that she kicks him and how would she feel if he kicked her. Then I said that he needed to forgive his sister and himself for not telling her to stop kicking him. We said it together and he hasn’t kicked children since then. When I substituted for the fifth grade teacher it was total chaos in that class. The teacher had not established the trust or respect of his students. Even though I teach library as a volunteer and most of these students knew me for the past three years I didn’t get the respect that I thought I would. Was so difficult getting them to do their lessons because all they wanted to do was affirm their feelings with their best friends. There were at least three girls and four boys doing this constantly disrupting the rest of the class. Overheard a conversation that a group of girls were having and asked what they were talking about. I could sense the embarrassment when I asked them and they wouldn’t tell me because I knew they were making fun of me. That was last year, this year there is a different spirit that pervades the schoolyard in classrooms. I’ve noticed that there are less arguments on the school grounds during recess. In the fifth grade class or Angels compared to last year’s devilish behavior that made that class AR scores lower than the second grade class. Not all students are prone to this miscreant kind of behavior., The fifth grade class of last year turned out a few above average students.
Physical Development
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year);
toddler (ages 1–3 years);
preschooler (ages 4–6 years);
school-aged child (ages 6–13 years);
adolescent (ages 13–19).[
Young adult 25 to 32
Middle adults 32 to 42
Older adults 42 to 65
Senior citizens 65 to demise

2] However, organizations like Zero to Three and the World Association for Infant Mental Health use the term infant as a broad category, including children from birth to age 3.

Piaget stages

Sensorimotor: (birth to about age 2)

According to Piaget, when an infant reaches about 7–9 months of age they begin to develop what he called object permanence, this means the child now has the ability to understand that objects keep existing even when they cannot be seen. An example of this would be hiding the child’s favorite toy under a blanket, although the child cannot physically see it they still know to look under the blanket.

Preoperational: (begins about the time the child starts to talk to about age 7)

During this stage of development, young children begin analyzing their environment using mental symbols. These symbols often include words and images and the child will begin to apply these various symbols in their everyday lives as they come across different objects, events, and situations.[5] However, Piaget’s main focus on this stage and the reason why he named it “preoperational” is because children at this point are not able to apply specific cognitive operations, such as mental math. In addition to symbolism, children now begin engaging in pretend play where they begin pretending to be people they are not (teachers, superhero’s), and they may use different props to make this pretend play more real.[5] Some deficiencies in this stage of development are that children who are about 3–4 years old often display what is called egocentrism, which means the child is not able to see someone else’s point of view, they feel as if every other person is experiencing the same events and feelings that they are experiencing. However, at about at 7 thought processes of children are no longer egocentric and are more intuitive, meaning they now think about the way something looks instead of rational thinking.[5]

Concrete: (about first grade to early adolescence)

During this stage, children begin developing cognitive operations and begin applying this new thinking to different events they may encounter.[5] Unlike the preoperational stage, children can now change and rearrange mental images and symbols to form a logical thought, an example of this is reversibility in which the child now has the ability to reverse an action just by doing the opposite.[5]

Formal operations:

The final stage of Piaget’s cognitive development defines a child as now having the ability to “think more rationally and systematically about abstract concepts and hypothetical events”.[5] Some positive aspects during this time is that child or adolescent begins forming their identity and begin understanding why people behave the way they behave. However, there are also some negative aspects which include the child or adolescent developing some egocentric thoughts which include the imaginary audience and the personal fable.[5] An imaginary audience is when an adolescent feels that the world is just as concerned and judgmental of anything the adolescent does as they are, an adolescent may feel as is they are “on stage” and everyone is a critique and they are the ones being critiqued.[5] A personal fable is when the adolescent feels that he or she is unique person and everything they do is unique. They feel as if they are the only ones that have ever experienced what they are experiencing and that they are invincible and nothing bad will happen to them it will only happen to others.[5]

Erik Erikson
Main articles: Erik Erikson and Psychosocial development

Erikson, a follower of Freud’s, synthesized both Freud’s and his own theories to create what is known as the “psychosocial” stages of human development, which span from birth to death, and focuses on “tasks” at each stage that must be accomplished to successfully navigate life’s challenges.[10]

Erikson’s eight stages consist of the following:

Trust vs. mistrust (infant)
Autonomy vs. shame (toddlerhood)
Initiative vs. guilt (preschooler)
Industry vs. inferiority (young adolescent)
Identity vs. role confusion (adolescent)
Intimacy vs. isolation (young adulthood)
Generativity vs. stagnation (middle adulthood)
Ego integrity vs. despair (old age)

[11]
Behavioral theories
Main article: Behavior analysis of child development

John B. Watson’s behaviorism theory forms the foundation of the behavioral model of development 1925.[12] He wrote extensively on child development and conducted research (see Little Albert experiment). Watson was instrumental in the modification of William James’ stream of consciousness approach to construct a stream of behavior theory.[citation needed] Watson also helped bring a natural science perspective to child psychology by introducing objective research methods based on observable and measurable behavior.[citation needed] Following Watson’s lead, B.F. Skinner further extended this model to cover operant conditioning and verbal behavior[citation needed]. Skinner used the operant chamber, or Skinner box, to observe the behavior of small organisms in a controlled situation and proved that organisms’ behaviors are impacted on the environment. Furthermore, he used reinforcement and punishment to shape in desired behavior.
Other theories

In accordance with his view that the sexual drive is a basic human motivation,[citation needed] Sigmund Freud developed a psychosexual theory of human development from infancy onward, divided into five stages.[citation needed] Each stage centered around the gratification of the libido within a particular area, or erogenous zone, of the body.[citation needed] He also argued that as humans develop, they become fixated on different and specific objects through their stages of development.[citation needed] Each stage contains conflict which requires resolution to enable the child to develop.[13]

The use of dynamical systems theory as a framework for the consideration of development began in the early 1990s and has continued into the present century.[14] Dynamic systems theory stresses nonlinear connections (e.g., between earlier and later social assertiveness) and the capacity of a system to reorganize as a phase shift that is stage-like in nature. Another useful concept for developmentalists is the attractor state, a condition (such as teething or stranger anxiety) that helps to determine apparently unrelated behaviors as well as related ones.[citation needed] Dynamic systems theory has been applied extensively to the study of motor development; the theory also has strong associations with some of Bowlby’s views about attachment systems. Dynamic systems theory also relates to the concept of the transactional process,[15] a mutually interactive process in which children and parents simultaneously influence each other, producing developmental change in both over time.[citation needed]

The “core knowledge perspective” is an evolutionary theory in child development that proposes “infants begin life with innate, special-purpose knowledge systems referred to as core domains of thought”[16] There are five core domains of thought, each of which is crucial for survival, which simultaneously prepare us to develop key aspects of early cognition; they are: physical, numerical, linguistic, psychological, and biological.[citation needed]
Continuity and discontinuity in development

Although the identification of developmental milestones is of interest to researchers and to children’s caregivers, many aspects of developmental change are continuous and do not display noticeable milestones of change.[17] Continuous developmental changes, like growth in stature, involve fairly gradual and predictable progress toward adult characteristics. When developmental change is discontinuous, however, researchers may identify not only milestones of development, but related age periods often called stages. A stage is a period of time, often associated with a known chronological age range, during which a behavior or physical characteristic is qualitatively different from what it is at other ages. When an age period is referred to as a stage, the term implies not only this qualitative difference, but also a predictable sequence of developmental events, such that each stage is both preceded and followed by specific other periods associated with characteristic behavioral or physical qualities.[18]

Stages of development may overlap or be associated with specific other aspects of development, such as speech or movement. Even within a particular developmental area, transition into a stage may not mean that the previous stage is completely finished. For example, in Erikson’s discussion of stages of personality, this theorist suggests that a lifetime is spent in reworking issues that were originally characteristic of a childhood stage.[19] Similarly, the theorist of cognitive development, Piaget, described situations in which children could solve one type of problem using mature thinking skills, but could not accomplish this for less familiar problems, a phenomenon he called horizontal decalage.[20]

The Four Elements</st

The Four Elements

We are Psyco-Emotional beings housed in Flesh and Bones, held together with Sinew and Muscles that protect our Internal Organs which are organized by our Two Brains. Our Rational Brain and Emotional Brain are working together to create the Life of our being based on our Beliefs about Ourselves, Others and the World around us. Scientists know now that every one of our Trillion Cells are in Concert working together with Melody, Design and Purpose to express what is called our

Our Bodies need Energy to sustain the Life, this we know from our Birth to Death. They say that it comes from the Four Basic Elements of our Universe. It has been said they are the Earth, Wind, Water and Fire. Unique as we are, the Third Planet from the Sun, we find our Life and our Breath from them. Our ancient Beliefs were inspired by natural observation have evolved into Scientific Truths that have come to sustain our Health in a Significant way. Our whole being is be said to be be employed in the use of our Body, Soul and Spirit that enables the creation of our Human experience.

Our World churns with an overwhelming for Life. From the beginning of Mankind we have learned to sustain our Bodies with Healthy Foods that enable us to live a Long Life.

Do-you-have-Soul Issues?

Much of our Soul Issues involve from the tendency of our emotional heart to control our decision making. Our emotional heart is desperately trying to fulfill those desires. Understanding our self-image can offers us a clear understanding of how the emotional heart is set in its disposition of control. Our bodies autonomic system controls all the functions of our body automatically by stimulating factors both physical and emotional which the body responds to attributes such as breathing, blood circulation, liver functions and our autoimmune function are some of its purposes. Scientists discovered in the mid nineties while the were mapping the brain that we actually haven three Brain’s: the Primeval Brain your Stomach, your Rational Brain and your Subconscious Brain.

Ancient Solfeggio Frequencies
Ancient Gregorian Chants have a new Scientific Methods called Iso Tones. You can play theses Solfeggio Frequencies at this Web Page. Solfeggio refers to a belief that a set of Nine frequencies that are derived from numerology were used Centuries ago in Gregorian and Sanskrit chants. These frequencies are believed to create positive shifts in your Mood when you are in close proximity to them. – See more at – Ancient Gregorian Chants

My Totem The Raven
In the mid-80s my friend best friend Tom moved to Anchorage Alaska. Tom had never been on the airplane before and so I went with him as his companion. While staying at his Father’s house I found that there was a park within waking distance nearby. I decided to visit and take some pictures. As I approached I discovered a small Lake, I stood there looking an thinking how desolate it looked with hardly any trees and the all of a sudden a Raven flew my head right over my head in front of me, it flipped upside down and back again and flew away. I did not know what to make of what had been so strangely occurred. I took it as an omen, but I never had any understanding as to what it meant until almost 30 years later. See more at – What’s Your Totem

Spirituality-transcending-Life

Spirituality page was taken from a Doctoral Study that I published on the web in 2006 called the New Century Believer. I taught it as a ten week study course at the Church that I was attending at the time, I was one of the Associate Pastors there. Not many people are interested in the Theology of the Bible and it just doesn’t float there boat. But if you can get through the eight paragraphs posted here you will have a better understanding of the spirituality and nature of the Spirit Self. I wanted to leave you with just one of the practical understandings and knowledge on how to change your Spirit Self and begin to live a – See more at – Spirituality-transcending-Life

The Box Metaphor

Let me begin by restating the ideas behind the “Introducing The Treasure Vault.Our life is a metaphor of intertwining aspects of our Psyco Emotional and Spirit Self. Although the nuance of this relationship seems to be unrelated they actually work together create Life in our Body.It’s is a term that I used to explain the relationship between our two Brains, the Rational and Emotional Brains. They work together creating a foundation of understanding that generates our Spirit Self –

Child Development

The parable of the sower As he was scattering the seed, some 1,) fell along the path, and the birds came and ate it up. 5 Some fell on rocky places, It sprang up quickly, because the soil was shallow. when the sun came up, the plants were scorched, and 2.) they withered because they had no root. 7 Other seed 3.) fell among thorns, which grew up and choked the plants, so that they did not bear grain. 8 Still 4.) other seed fell on good soil. It came up, grew and produced a crop, some multiplying thirty, some sixty, some a hundred times.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development
Emotional Develment
The emotional development of Children from conception to death.
In the womb a child can sense the emotions of the mother. Negative emotions and extreme trauma can greatly affect the development of a child’s emotions after birth as well as a difficult birth itself.
Physical development is critical in the first four weeks of the child’s health, the colostrum of the mothers milk develops a strong immune system for later life. From four weeks to one year old a child experiences the world around them primarily with their five senses. In reality they are still using a spiritual intuitive reasoning to understand this new world that they are growing in. They begin to express themselves in speech by watching their parents lips and hearing the words spoken to them and then trying to imitate those words. With much repetition and understanding of the words begin to establish the reality of the world around them. From the ages of 1 to 3 years old trust relationships are established and their vocabulary grows as they learn about the world around them. And yet they still haven’t developed a spatial relationship in their environment. If you offer a three-year-old a piece of apple they will most likely say yes. If you asked them after putting the Apple behind your back and ask where is the Apple often don’t know. Preschoolers come to school with an awh of social involvement and an intense desire to learn. My experience with preschoolers revealed that some of them, 15 to 20%, come with deep-seated emotional problems due to negative parenting and also sibling rivalry. The learned behavior from these children often causes them to be jealous of their classmates. Nutrition plays heavily on all Children’s development. Poor nutrition in a preschooler can cause midrange attention deficit. It is evident which children are not being properly cared for at home, they perk right up right after having a snack. The trust level is high among preschoolers and continues to the second grade. I found this to be true because these children when I first meet them often come and hug my leg, they continue up until the second grade. These children are it in the best position for learning than any other grade level, they achieve the highest scores on their AR tests. You have to wonder why the fourth and fifth graders are not scoring as well.

Eight years old is a new beginning for children. In the summer they begin to establish relationships and build new friendships with their peers. They are experiencing new freedom of independence from their parents and guardians, and their dependence in reliance on them dwindles until about 10 years old. Girls experience a physical logical change in their sexuality while boys change around 12 and 13 years old. Ggirls bodies mature faster and they are taller for the same age in this growth period, and because they are more emotionally stable they tend to pay better attention and score higher on tests. The boys, who are more rationally minded and competitive seem to have a attention deficit from their growing conflicts in the classroom. Throughout these grades 3 through 5 the children are threatened by their environment both in and out of school and seek out close relationships to establish best friends. I have found that on the playground children congregate with their best friends and there are often arguments that develop between those who are not best friends. So often I’ve seen children crying because of perceived nonacceptance or misunderstood actions and words. By the time the children reach the end of the fifth grade they develop an attitude of full independence. Some children develop earlier than others and some children hold this rebellion inward instead of rebelling outwardly violently in a real and dramatic way. I have seen this behavior as young as kindergarten children. Mostly in young boys have been abused at home and the only way they know how to react is that learned emotional behavior that the learned from parent or siblings. When substituting in the second grade class within the first few minutes of the class out of the corner of my eye I saw a young man kick someone. Class told me right off that the teacher has a table over in the corner and that when someone misbehaves they have to go there and write why they have done that bad thing. I took him to the table and assumed that he would write down why he had kicked the other student. I checked on him later and he hadn’t written anything, and again later and still nothing after I explained why he needed to explain his actions. At the end of the class I went over and sat down with him and having an understanding of learned behavior from parents and our siblings I guess that someone was kicking him at home. I asked him to did have an older sister, I guessed right. When I asked him if she was kicking him he started crying. I calmed him down and said it is going to be okay. I said that he needed to tell his sister that it isn’t right that she kicks him and how would she feel if he kicked her. Then I said that he needed to forgive his sister and himself for not telling her to stop kicking him. We said it together and he hasn’t kicked children since then. When I substituted for the fifth grade teacher it was total chaos in that class. The teacher had not established the trust or respect of his students. Even though I teach library as a volunteer and most of these students knew me for the past three years I didn’t get the respect that I thought I would. Was so difficult getting them to do their lessons because all they wanted to do was affirm their feelings with their best friends. There were at least three girls and four boys doing this constantly disrupting the rest of the class. Overheard a conversation that a group of girls were having and asked what they were talking about. I could sense the embarrassment when I asked them and they wouldn’t tell me because I knew they were making fun of me. That was last year, this year there is a different spirit that pervades the schoolyard in classrooms. I’ve noticed that there are less arguments on the school grounds during recess. In the fifth grade class or Angels compared to last year’s devilish behavior that made that class AR scores lower than the second grade class. Not all students are prone to this miscreant kind of behavior., The fifth grade class of last year turned out a few above average students.

Physical Development
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year);
toddler (ages 1–3 years);
preschooler (ages 4–6 years);
school-aged child (ages 6–13 years);
adolescent (ages 13–19).[
Young adult 25 to 32
Middle adults 32 to 42
Older adults 42 to 65
Senior citizens 65 to demise

2] However, organizations like Zero to Three and the World Association for Infant Mental Health use the term infant as a broad category, including children from birth to age 3.

Piaget stages

Sensorimotor: (birth to about age 2)

According to Piaget, when an infant reaches about 7–9 months of age they begin to develop what he called object permanence, this means the child now has the ability to understand that objects keep existing even when they cannot be seen. An example of this would be hiding the child’s favorite toy under a blanket, although the child cannot physically see it they still know to look under the blanket.

Preoperational: (begins about the time the child starts to talk to about age 7)

During this stage of development, young children begin analyzing their environment using mental symbols. These symbols often include words and images and the child will begin to apply these various symbols in their everyday lives as they come across different objects, events, and situations.[5] However, Piaget’s main focus on this stage and the reason why he named it “preoperational” is because children at this point are not able to apply specific cognitive operations, such as mental math. In addition to symbolism, children now begin engaging in pretend play where they begin pretending to be people they are not (teachers, superhero’s), and they may use different props to make this pretend play more real.[5] Some deficiencies in this stage of development are that children who are about 3–4 years old often display what is called egocentrism, which means the child is not able to see someone else’s point of view, they feel as if every other person is experiencing the same events and feelings that they are experiencing. However, at about at 7 thought processes of children are no longer egocentric and are more intuitive, meaning they now think about the way something looks instead of rational thinking.[5]

Concrete: (about first grade to early adolescence)

During this stage, children begin developing cognitive operations and begin applying this new thinking to different events they may encounter.[5] Unlike the preoperational stage, children can now change and rearrange mental images and symbols to form a logical thought, an example of this is reversibility in which the child now has the ability to reverse an action just by doing the opposite.[5]

Formal operations:

The final stage of Piaget’s cognitive development defines a child as now having the ability to “think more rationally and systematically about abstract concepts and hypothetical events”.[5] Some positive aspects during this time is that child or adolescent begins forming their identity and begin understanding why people behave the way they behave. However, there are also some negative aspects which include the child or adolescent developing some egocentric thoughts which include the imaginary audience and the personal fable.[5] An imaginary audience is when an adolescent feels that the world is just as concerned and judgmental of anything the adolescent does as they are, an adolescent may feel as is they are “on stage” and everyone is a critique and they are the ones being critiqued.[5] A personal fable is when the adolescent feels that he or she is unique person and everything they do is unique. They feel as if they are the only ones that have ever experienced what they are experiencing and that they are invincible and nothing bad will happen to them it will only happen to others.[5]

Erik Erikson
Main articles: Erik Erikson and Psychosocial development

Erikson, a follower of Freud’s, synthesized both Freud’s and his own theories to create what is known as the “psychosocial” stages of human development, which span from birth to death, and focuses on “tasks” at each stage that must be accomplished to successfully navigate life’s challenges.[10]

Erikson’s eight stages consist of the following:

Trust vs. mistrust (infant)
Autonomy vs. shame (toddlerhood)
Initiative vs. guilt (preschooler)
Industry vs. inferiority (young adolescent)
Identity vs. role confusion (adolescent)
Intimacy vs. isolation (young adulthood)
Generativity vs. stagnation (middle adulthood)
Ego integrity vs. despair (old age)

[11]
Behavioral theories
Main article: Behavior analysis of child development

John B. Watson’s behaviorism theory forms the foundation of the behavioral model of development 1925.[12] He wrote extensively on child development and conducted research (see Little Albert experiment). Watson was instrumental in the modification of William James’ stream of consciousness approach to construct a stream of behavior theory.[citation needed] Watson also helped bring a natural science perspective to child psychology by introducing objective research methods based on observable and measurable behavior.[citation needed] Following Watson’s lead, B.F. Skinner further extended this model to cover operant conditioning and verbal behavior[citation needed]. Skinner used the operant chamber, or Skinner box, to observe the behavior of small organisms in a controlled situation and proved that organisms’ behaviors are impacted on the environment. Furthermore, he used reinforcement and punishment to shape in desired behavior.
Other theories

In accordance with his view that the sexual drive is a basic human motivation,[citation needed] Sigmund Freud developed a psychosexual theory of human development from infancy onward, divided into five stages.[citation needed] Each stage centered around the gratification of the libido within a particular area, or erogenous zone, of the body.[citation needed] He also argued that as humans develop, they become fixated on different and specific objects through their stages of development.[citation needed] Each stage contains conflict which requires resolution to enable the child to develop.[13]

The use of dynamical systems theory as a framework for the consideration of development began in the early 1990s and has continued into the present century.[14] Dynamic systems theory stresses nonlinear connections (e.g., between earlier and later social assertiveness) and the capacity of a system to reorganize as a phase shift that is stage-like in nature. Another useful concept for developmentalists is the attractor state, a condition (such as teething or stranger anxiety) that helps to determine apparently unrelated behaviors as well as related ones.[citation needed] Dynamic systems theory has been applied extensively to the study of motor development; the theory also has strong associations with some of Bowlby’s views about attachment systems. Dynamic systems theory also relates to the concept of the transactional process,[15] a mutually interactive process in which children and parents simultaneously influence each other, producing developmental change in both over time.[citation needed]

The “core knowledge perspective” is an evolutionary theory in child development that proposes “infants begin life with innate, special-purpose knowledge systems referred to as core domains of thought”[16] There are five core domains of thought, each of which is crucial for survival, which simultaneously prepare us to develop key aspects of early cognition; they are: physical, numerical, linguistic, psychological, and biological.[citation needed]
Continuity and discontinuity in development

Although the identification of developmental milestones is of interest to researchers and to children’s caregivers, many aspects of developmental change are continuous and do not display noticeable milestones of change.[17] Continuous developmental changes, like growth in stature, involve fairly gradual and predictable progress toward adult characteristics. When developmental change is discontinuous, however, researchers may identify not only milestones of development, but related age periods often called stages. A stage is a period of time, often associated with a known chronological age range, during which a behavior or physical characteristic is qualitatively different from what it is at other ages. When an age period is referred to as a stage, the term implies not only this qualitative difference, but also a predictable sequence of developmental events, such that each stage is both preceded and followed by specific other periods associated with characteristic behavioral or physical qualities.[18]

Stages of development may overlap or be associated with specific other aspects of development, such as speech or movement. Even within a particular developmental area, transition into a stage may not mean that the previous stage is completely finished. For example, in Erikson’s discussion of stages of personality, this theorist suggests that a lifetime is spent in reworking issues that were originally characteristic of a childhood stage.[19] Similarly, the theorist of cognitive development, Piaget, described situations in which children could solve one type of problem using mature thinking skills, but could not accomplish this for less familiar problems, a phenomenon he called horizontal decalage.[20]

Our Bodies need Energy to sustain the Life, this we know from our Birth to Death. They say that it comes from the Four Basic Elements of our Universe. It has been said they are the Earth, Wind, Water and Fire. Unique as we are, the Third Planet from the Sun, we find our Life and our Breath from them. Our ancient Beliefs were inspired by natural observation have evolved into Scientific Truths that have come to sustain our Health in a Significant way. Our whole being is be said to be be employed in the use of our Body, Soul and Spirit that enables the creation of our Human experience. Ancient Religions used Meditation to gain a larger perception of Man’s Spirit. Ancient Gregorian Chants a new Scientific Method

Our World churns with an overwhelming for Life. From the beginning of Mankind we have learned to sustain our Bodies with Healthy Foods that enable us to live a Long Life.

Do-you-have-Soul Issues?

Much of our Soul Issues involve from the tendency of our emotional heart to control our decision making. Our emotional heart is desperately trying to fulfill those desires. Understanding our self-image can offers us a clear understanding of how the emotional heart is set in its disposition of control. Our bodies autonomic system controls all the functions of our body automatically by stimulating factors both physical and emotional which the body responds to attributes such as breathing, blood circulation, liver functions and our autoimmune function are some of its purposes. Scientists discovered in the mid nineties while the were mapping the brain that we actually have two – See more at – Do-you-have-Soul Issues?

Ancient Solfeggio Frequencies
Ancient Gregorian Chants have a new Scientific Methods called Iso Tones. You can play theses Solfeggio Frequencies at this Web Page. Solfeggio refers to a belief that a set of Nine frequencies that are derived from numerology were used Centuries ago in Gregorian and Sanskrit chants. These frequencies are believed to create positive shifts in your Mood when you are in close proximity to them. – See more at – Ancient Gregorian Chants

The Box Metaphor

Let me begin by restating the ideas behind the “Introducing The Treasure Vault.Our life is a metaphor of intertwining aspects of our Psyco Emotional and Spirit Self. Although the nuance of this relationship seems to be unrelated they actually work together create Life in our Body.It’s is a term that I used to explain the relationship between our two Brains, the Rational and Emotional Brains. They work together creating a foundation of understanding that generates our Spirit Self –

Child Development

The parable of the sower As he was scattering the seed, some 1,) fell along the path, and the birds came and ate it up. 5 Some fell on rocky places, It sprang up quickly, because the soil was shallow. when the sun came up, the plants were scorched, and 2.) they withered because they had no root. 7 Other seed 3.) fell among thorns, which grew up and choked the plants, so that they did not bear grain. 8 Still 4.) other seed fell on good soil. It came up, grew and produced a crop, some multiplying thirty, some sixty, some a hundred times.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development
Emotional Develment
The emotional development of Children from conception to death.
In the womb a child can sense the emotions of the mother. Negative emotions and extreme trauma can greatly affect the development of a child’s emotions after birth as well as a difficult birth itself.
Physical development is critical in the first four weeks of the child’s health, the colostrum of the mothers milk develops a strong immune system for later life. From four weeks to one year old a child experiences the world around them primarily with their five senses. In reality they are still using a spiritual intuitive reasoning to understand this new world that they are growing in. They begin to express themselves in speech by watching their parents lips and hearing the words spoken to them and then trying to imitate those words. With much repetition and understanding of the words begin to establish the reality of the world around them. From the ages of 1 to 3 years old trust relationships are established and their vocabulary grows as they learn about the world around them. And yet they still haven’t developed a spatial relationship in their environment. If you offer a three-year-old a piece of apple they will most likely say yes. If you asked them after putting the Apple behind your back and ask where is the Apple often don’t know. Preschoolers come to school with an awh of social involvement and an intense desire to learn. My experience with preschoolers revealed that some of them, 15 to 20%, come with deep-seated emotional problems due to negative parenting and also sibling rivalry. The learned behavior from these children often causes them to be jealous of their classmates. Nutrition plays heavily on all Children’s development. Poor nutrition in a preschooler can cause midrange attention deficit. It is evident which children are not being properly cared for at home, they perk right up right after having a snack. The trust level is high among preschoolers and continues to the second grade. I found this to be true because these children when I first meet them often come and hug my leg, they continue up until the second grade. These children are it in the best position for learning than any other grade level, they achieve the highest scores on their AR tests. You have to wonder why the fourth and fifth graders are not scoring as well.

Eight years old is a new beginning for children. In the summer they begin to establish relationships and build new friendships with their peers. They are experiencing new freedom of independence from their parents and guardians, and their dependence in reliance on them dwindles until about 10 years old. Girls experience a physical logical change in their sexuality while boys change around 12 and 13 years old. Ggirls bodies mature faster and they are taller for the same age in this growth period, and because they are more emotionally stable they tend to pay better attention and score higher on tests. The boys, who are more rationally minded and competitive seem to have a attention deficit from their growing conflicts in the classroom. Throughout these grades 3 through 5 the children are threatened by their environment both in and out of school and seek out close relationships to establish best friends. I have found that on the playground children congregate with their best friends and there are often arguments that develop between those who are not best friends. So often I’ve seen children crying because of perceived nonacceptance or misunderstood actions and words. By the time the children reach the end of the fifth grade they develop an attitude of full independence. Some children develop earlier than others and some children hold this rebellion inward instead of rebelling outwardly violently in a real and dramatic way. I have seen this behavior as young as kindergarten children. Mostly in young boys have been abused at home and the only way they know how to react is that learned emotional behavior that the learned from parent or siblings. When substituting in the second grade class within the first few minutes of the class out of the corner of my eye I saw a young man kick someone. Class told me right off that the teacher has a table over in the corner and that when someone misbehaves they have to go there and write why they have done that bad thing. I took him to the table and assumed that he would write down why he had kicked the other student. I checked on him later and he hadn’t written anything, and again later and still nothing after I explained why he needed to explain his actions. At the end of the class I went over and sat down with him and having an understanding of learned behavior from parents and our siblings I guess that someone was kicking him at home. I asked him to did have an older sister, I guessed right. When I asked him if she was kicking him he started crying. I calmed him down and said it is going to be okay. I said that he needed to tell his sister that it isn’t right that she kicks him and how would she feel if he kicked her. Then I said that he needed to forgive his sister and himself for not telling her to stop kicking him. We said it together and he hasn’t kicked children since then. When I substituted for the fifth grade teacher it was total chaos in that class. The teacher had not established the trust or respect of his students. Even though I teach library as a volunteer and most of these students knew me for the past three years I didn’t get the respect that I thought I would. Was so difficult getting them to do their lessons because all they wanted to do was affirm their feelings with their best friends. There were at least three girls and four boys doing this constantly disrupting the rest of the class. Overheard a conversation that a group of girls were having and asked what they were talking about. I could sense the embarrassment when I asked them and they wouldn’t tell me because I knew they were making fun of me. That was last year, this year there is a different spirit that pervades the schoolyard in classrooms. I’ve noticed that there are less arguments on the school grounds during recess. In the fifth grade class or Angels compared to last year’s devilish behavior that made that class AR scores lower than the second grade class. Not all students are prone to this miscreant kind of behavior., The fifth grade class of last year turned out a few above average students…

Physical Development/strong
Some age-related development periods and examples of defined intervals are: newborn (ages 0–4 weeks); infant (ages 4 weeks – 1 year);
toddler (ages 1–3 years);
preschooler (ages 4–6 years);
school-aged child (ages 6–13 years);
adolescent (ages 13–19).[
Young adult 25 to 32
Middle adults 32 to 42
Older adults 42 to 65
Senior citizens 65 to demise

2] However, organizations like Zero to Three and the World Association for Infant Mental Health use the term infant as a broad category, including children from birth to age 3.

Piaget stages

Sensorimotor: (birth to about age 2)

According to Piaget, when an infant reaches about 7–9 months of age they begin to develop what he called object permanence, this means the child now has the ability to understand that objects keep existing even when they cannot be seen. An example of this would be hiding the child’s favorite toy under a blanket, although the child cannot physically see it they still know to look under the blanket.

Preoperational: (begins about the time the child starts to talk to about age 7)

During this stage of development, young children begin analyzing their environment using mental symbols. These symbols often include words and images and the child will begin to apply these various symbols in their everyday lives as they come across different objects, events, and situations.[5] However, Piaget’s main focus on this stage and the reason why he named it “preoperational” is because children at this point are not able to apply specific cognitive operations, such as mental math. In addition to symbolism, children now begin engaging in pretend play where they begin pretending to be people they are not (teachers, superhero’s), and they may use different props to make this pretend play more real.[5] Some deficiencies in this stage of development are that children who are about 3–4 years old often display what is called egocentrism, which means the child is not able to see someone else’s point of view, they feel as if every other person is experiencing the same events and feelings that they are experiencing. However, at about at 7 thought processes of children are no longer egocentric and are more intuitive, meaning they now think about the way something looks instead of rational thinking.[5]

Concrete: (about first grade to early adolescence)

During this stage, children begin developing cognitive operations and begin applying this new thinking to different events they may encounter.[5] Unlike the preoperational stage, children can now change and rearrange mental images and symbols to form a logical thought, an example of this is reversibility in which the child now has the ability to reverse an action just by doing the opposite.[5]

Formal operations:

The final stage of Piaget’s cognitive development defines a child as now having the ability to “think more rationally and systematically about abstract concepts and hypothetical events”.[5] Some positive aspects during this time is that child or adolescent begins forming their identity and begin understanding why people behave the way they behave. However, there are also some negative aspects which include the child or adolescent developing some egocentric thoughts which include the imaginary audience and the personal fable.[5] An imaginary audience is when an adolescent feels that the world is just as concerned and judgmental of anything the adolescent does as they are, an adolescent may feel as is they are “on stage” and everyone is a critique and they are the ones being critiqued.[5] A personal fable is when the adolescent feels that he or she is unique person and everything they do is unique. They feel as if they are the only ones that have ever experienced what they are experiencing and that they are invincible and nothing bad will happen to them it will only happen to others.[5]

Erik Erikson
Main articles: Erik Erikson and Psychosocial development

Erikson, a follower of Freud’s, synthesized both Freud’s and his own theories to create what is known as the “psychosocial” stages of human development, which span from birth to death, and focuses on “tasks” at each stage that must be accomplished to successfully navigate life’s challenges.[10]

Erikson’s eight stages consist of the following:

Trust vs. mistrust (infant)
Autonomy vs. shame (toddlerhood)
Initiative vs. guilt (preschooler)
Industry vs. inferiority (young adolescent)
Identity vs. role confusion (adolescent)
Intimacy vs. isolation (young adulthood)
Generativity vs. stagnation (middle adulthood)
Ego integrity vs. despair (old age)

[11]
Behavioral theories
Main article: Behavior analysis of child development

John B. Watson’s behaviorism theory forms the foundation of the behavioral model of development 1925.[12] He wrote extensively on child development and conducted research (see Little Albert experiment). Watson was instrumental in the modification of William James’ stream of consciousness approach to construct a stream of behavior theory.[citation needed] Watson also helped bring a natural science perspective to child psychology by introducing objective research methods based on observable and measurable behavior.[citation needed] Following Watson’s lead, B.F. Skinner further extended this model to cover operant conditioning and verbal behavior[citation needed]. Skinner used the operant chamber, or Skinner box, to observe the behavior of small organisms in a controlled situation and proved that organisms’ behaviors are impacted on the environment. Furthermore, he used reinforcement and punishment to shape in desired behavior.
Other theories

In accordance with his view that the sexual drive is a basic human motivation,[citation needed] Sigmund Freud developed a psychosexual theory of human development from infancy onward, divided into five stages.[citation needed] Each stage centered around the gratification of the libido within a particular area, or erogenous zone, of the body.[citation needed] He also argued that as humans develop, they become fixated on different and specific objects through their stages of development.[citation needed] Each stage contains conflict which requires resolution to enable the child to develop.[13]

The use of dynamical systems theory as a framework for the consideration of development began in the early 1990s and has continued into the present century.[14] Dynamic systems theory stresses nonlinear connections (e.g., between earlier and later social assertiveness) and the capacity of a system to reorganize as a phase shift that is stage-like in nature. Another useful concept for developmentalists is the attractor state, a condition (such as teething or stranger anxiety) that helps to determine apparently unrelated behaviors as well as related ones.[citation needed] Dynamic systems theory has been applied extensively to the study of motor development; the theory also has strong associations with some of Bowlby’s views about attachment systems. Dynamic systems theory also relates to the concept of the transactional process,[15] a mutually interactive process in which children and parents simultaneously influence each other, producing developmental change in both over time.[citation needed]

The “core knowledge perspective” is an evolutionary theory in child development that proposes “infants begin life with innate, special-purpose knowledge systems referred to as core domains of thought”[16] There are five core domains of thought, each of which is crucial for survival, which simultaneously prepare us to develop key aspects of early cognition; they are: physical, numerical, linguistic, psychological, and biological.[citation needed]
Continuity and discontinuity in development

Although the identification of developmental milestones is of interest to researchers and to children’s caregivers, many aspects of developmental change are continuous and do not display noticeable milestones of change.[17] Continuous developmental changes, like growth in stature, involve fairly gradual and predictable progress toward adult characteristics. When developmental change is discontinuous, however, researchers may identify not only milestones of development, but related age periods often called stages. A stage is a period of time, often associated with a known chronological age range, during which a behavior or physical characteristic is qualitatively different from what it is at other ages. When an age period is referred to as a stage, the term implies not only this qualitative difference, but also a predictable sequence of developmental events, such that each stage is both preceded and followed by specific other periods associated with characteristic behavioral or physical qualities.[18]

Stages of development may overlap or be associated with specific other aspects of development, such as speech or movement. Even within a particular developmental area, transition into a stage may not mean that the previous stage is completely finished. For example, in Erikson’s discussion of stages of personality, this theorist suggests that a lifetime is spent in reworking issues that were originally characteristic of a childhood stage.[19] Similarly, the theorist of cognitive development, Piaget, described situations in which children could solve one type of problem using mature thinking skills, but could not accomplish this for less familiar problems, a phenomenon he called horizontal decalage.[20]

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